Funding Indigenous Peoples: Strategies for Support

Funding Indigenous Peoples: Strategies for Support, looks at how funders collaborate with and bring support to indigenous communities around the world. Through examples from a diverse range of foundations, this guide explores how grantmakers work with indigenous peoples, the approaches they take, and the practices they find effective.

This guide was developed in collaboration with International Funders for Indigenous Peoples (IFIP).

What's in the Guide?

Who Are Indigenous Peoples?
Giving to indigenous communities and causes represents a sliver of global philanthropy. We begin this guide by providing context about how indigenous peoples have fought to identify themselves in the world, supported by international mechanisms.

Indigenous Issues 
This section frames the main issues affecting indigenous peoples. The description of these issues offers funders a basis for understanding the scope of projects and collaborations currently funded.

Programs That Support Indigenous Peoples
Many funders support indigenous peoples through support for the environment, human rights, and international affairs. We explore the rationale behind why these are the primary areas of investment.

Strategies and Approaches
Funders can start or expand their collaboration with indigenous communities through a variety of strategies. We discuss the programmatic and logistical strategies that funders of all types are using to define and structure their support.

Tools for Partnering With Indigenous Communities
Whether you are new to indigenous philanthropy or a seasoned pro, this section shares funder tips for effective relationships with indigenous peoples.

Definitions
As with most of the social sector, there are many acronyms, names, and jargon tied to indigenous philanthropy. Here, we provide the essential lexicon.

Additional Reading and Endnotes
These resources were the source of supporting information throughout this guide and are excellent next steps for funders wanting to explore indigenous peoples more deeply.

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